Thursday, August 30, 2012

Nominations for our annual LTA Awards (2011-2012 LTA Season)

The LTA Awards are presented Annually in October at a formal gala to honor the best productions, directors, actors, and designers from the prior season. In addition special awards are handed out to volunteers who have made a significant contribution to The Little Theatre of Alexandria.  Below are the nominations for the 2011-2012 LTA Season.


Sound Design

David Correia and David Hale for Hairspray
David Correia and David Hale for 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee
David Correia for All the King's Women


Props Design

Nicole Zuchetto for Rabbit Hole
Benjamin and Heather Norcross for Noises Off
Eddy Roger Parker for 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee


Costume Design

Jean Schlichting and Kit Sibley for Hairspray
Susan Boyd for Witness for the Prosecution
Bobbie Herbst and Nicole Zuchetto for All the King's Women


Lighting Design

Ken and Patti Crowley for Rabbit Hole
Chris Hardy for Noises Off
Nancy Owens and Liz Owens for Heaven Can Wait


Set Design

C. Evans Kirk and Dan Remmers for Noises Off
John Downing for Heaven Can Wait
John Downing for Witness for the Prosecution


Set Painting

Leslie Reed for 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee
Mary Hutzler for Heaven Can Wait
Deidre (De) Nicholson-Lamb for Witness for the Prosecution


Set Construction

Dan Remmers for Noises Off
Chris Feldmann for 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee
John Downing for Heaven Can Wait



Set Decoration

Nancyanne Burton, Jean and Allen Stuhl for Rabbit Hole
Nancyanne Burton, Jean and Allen Stuhl for 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee
Nancyanne Burton, Jean and Allen Stuhl for Heaven Can Wait


Makeup Design

Robin Parker for Hairspray
Robin Parker for Rabbit Hole
Robin Parker and Hannah Wolf for All the King's Women


Hair Design

Anna Michelle Jackson, Irene Kasotakis, Margaret Murphy and Sue Pinkman for Hairspray
Robin Parker for Rabbit Hole
Robin Parker and Hannah Wolf for All the King's Women


Best Bit Role

Scott J. Strasbaugh as Mr. Pinky in Hairspray
Jody Lynn Parker as Little Inez in Hairspray
John Crowley as Timothy Allgood in Noises Off


Best Minor Role

Gina C. Tomkus as Prudy Pingleton, Prison Matron & Gym Teacher in Hairspray
Brenda Parker as Motormouth Maybelle in Hairspray
Adrian Cubbage as Seaweed J. Stubbs in Hairspray


Best Junior Performance

Sam Jones as Link Larkin in Hairspray
Derrick "Blake" Hopkins, Jr. as Stooie (Ensemble) in Hairspray


Best Supporting Role in a Musical

Christopher Harris as Edna Turnblad in Hairspray
Eric Hughes as Chip Tolentino in 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee
Josh Goldman as Leaf Coneybear in 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee



Best Supporting Role in a Play

Rebecca Lenehan as Nat in Rabbit Hole
Rebecca Phillips as Izzy in Rabbit Hole
Cal Whitehurst as Mr. Jordan in Heaven Can Wait
John Shackelford as Max Levine in Heaven Can Wait


Best Lead Role in a Musical

Shannon Kingett as Tracy Turnblad in Hairspray
Jeff Davis as Vice Principal Douglas Panch in 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee
Maureen Rohn as Olive Ostrovsky in 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee


Best Lead Role in a Play

Karen Jadlos Shotts as Becca in Rabbit Hole
Mark Lee Adams as Sir Wilfred Roberts, Q.C. in Witness for the Prosecution
Sarah Holt as Saleswoman, Barbara, Eve, Beth & Mona in All the King's Women


Best Musical Director

Christopher A. Tomasino for Hairspray
Christopher A. Tomasino for 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee


Best Choreographer

Iván Dávila for Hairspray
Grace Manly Machanic for 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee


Best Stage Director

Sue Pinkman for Hairspray
Joanna Henry for Rabbit Hole
Frank D. Shutts II for 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee


Friday, August 24, 2012

Interview with Erik Harrison from LTA's Funny Money



What do you find appealing about your character and this show?

Henry is a man who has been moderately successful at a career he likes but doesn't love, with a pretty house and a pretty wife, and not a lot else. I've been in that sort of place myself. Funny Money is a little bit like wish fulfillment for me - what would happen if you were given the chance to completely change your life?

What have you learned about yourself in playing the role of “Henry”?

You mean, what have I learned other than how bloody bad I am at memorizing lines?

I think Henry has been a real challenge for me as an actor, but that's all boring inside baseball stuff. What I've learned as a person is that the theatre, the chance to perform for others - that's my briefcase full of money. Henry wants out of his hum-drum daily life.
My daily life can be pretty hum-drum as well, but in the evening I get to go play make believe with other adults who never grew up. Then after a few months of play, I get to show hundreds of people what we made up, and they applaud us. That's pretty remarkable.

What do you want the audience to experience/take away from this show?

I want them to laugh so hard it hurts. I want them to feel completely spirited away from whatever their daily life is, cocooned in the glorious dark of the theatre, transported to the Perkin's living room via the magic of the stage, then I want them to laugh until they think they're going to be sick. It's like the man said "There's a lot to be said for making people laugh. Did you know that's all some people have? It isn't much, but it's better than nothing in this cockeyed caravan. Boy!"

How long have you been acting and what made you get involved in theatre?

I acted a lot as a young man, in junior high and high school - my father was an actor, so I avoided the pull of the stage a bit when I was younger, out of a sort of rebellion, but when I was 14 a school production of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" proved too much to resist.

Then, when I turned 18 I promptly gave it all up in a concerted effort to Go To College and Get A Career and Get Married and Be Respectable.

How did you get involved with LTA?

About 10 years later, the whole Be Respectable thing lead to a divorce, quitting my job, and abandoning psychology, which my degree was in. I moved to Virginia just for a change. On the very first day in Virginia, a friend convinced me to audition for my first play in a decade. That was "Play It Again, Sam" at LTA. I didn't get cast, but I had more fun at the four hours of the callback than I had had in ages.
I immediately started auditioning again, and about six months later I got a role at Port City Playhouse (Farragut North, which I was immensely proud of). When an actor dropped out of LTA's production of The Visit, some people who had seen me in Farragut North invited me to sign on as a last minute replacement. I've been here ever since.

What advice would you give others who are interested in working in theatre?

Start! If you want to act, audition. If that intimidates you, take a class. If you don't want to act, volunteer. If you are afraid that there isn't a role for you, volunteer anyway. There is more work than you can imagine, and room for any number of skills and personalities, as long as you show up and try hard.

And if you still can't figure it out - ask me! I'll be at the show, won't I? Come up to me after a performance, and I guarantee I can put you in touch with someone who will put you to work...

Erik Harrison (Henry Perkins) has played several roles, but they are like his children, so rather than play favorites in this limited space, he will mention none of them. He has no actual children, nor does he have a cat, dog, girlfriend, boyfriend, wife, husband, deity, fish or other life companion to thank. Instead, he would like to profusely apologize to his cast and crew for any number of wrongs committed in the course of the show, the least of which is this bio itself. Sorry, guys. Drinks on me.



Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Interview with Charlene Sloan from LTA's Funny Money


What do you find appealing about your character and this show?
I play Jean Perkins and she is a really great character to play. She goes through a huge emotional journey in the show and that makes her so complex and exciting to portray. She does take a lot of energy and even though it can be exhausting at times it has been so rewarding.  Funny Money is just such a fun show to work on. The script is hilarious and we laugh through rehearsals as we discover more and more about our characters and the ridiculous situation they find themselves in.
What have you learned about yourself in playing the role of “Jean Perkins”?
Hmmm. I think I have just learned how to emote more. In my real life I don’t always feel comfortable showing emotions like anger, fear, or sadness, so I was afraid that might limit me in terms of showing the range of emotions that the character Jean Perkins feels. Of course, I still feel those emotions, so I learned to just be free, trust my director and cast mates and let those emotions out…In a funny way, of course!
What do you want the audience to experience/take away from this show?
I just want the audience to laugh out loud. Funny Money is a comedy and so laughter is really the goal, but I would also like the audience to be able to identify with the characters. Even though it is a comedy, we have worked hard in rehearsals to make the characters realistic so that audience members could see a little of themselves in each of us. I want the audience to see the characters as real people who get caught in a ridiculous situation. That’s where the comedy is created.
How long have you been acting and what made you get involved in theatre? How did you get involved with LTA?
I started acting last December, so I am really a newbie, but I love it. My first show was “It’s a Wonderful Life: A Radio Play.” It was a great start into stage acting because it was a radio play, which allowed us to keep our scripts with us on stage. Even though I had the lines memorized by the time performances started, it was such a comfort to a new actor to have the script with me. Now, I can’t wait to get the lines memorized so I can get rid of the script and really get more into the character!
I got involved in theater because I always loved seeing shows and would get excited to go to the theater, but when I would arrive and take my seat I always felt a sadness that I couldn’t understand for the longest time. Then, I saw a recent production of “Follies” at The Kennedy Center and it hit me, “I wish I was up there doing that.” Now, I don’t have that tinge of sadness when I go to the theater because I am able to take part as both an actor and an audience member.
I got involved with LTA by auditioning for Funny Money. I knew LTA was a phenomenal group and I thought I would learn a lot just by auditioning. I went to the audition thinking, “I’m not gonna get a part, but the audition itself will be fun.” And it was; getting a part was a “double bonus.”
What advice would you give others who are interested in working in theatre?
Just do it! If you are interested, get involved. Audition, volunteer, take a class, whatever. Don’t listen to doubters or fears in your own mind. If you are interested in taking part in theater whether it is as an actor or behind the scenes then go for it. Life is too short to not try things you feel a passion for.
Charlene Sloan (Jean Perkins) is thrilled to be making her LTA debut in Funny Money. Previous roles include Anne in a staged reading of The Slippery Ladies Book Club (RCP), Kay Ridgeway-Mostyn in Murder on the Nile (PTC) and Matilda/Ruth Daiken Bailey/Mrs. Thompson/Sadie Vance in It’s a Wonderful Life: A Radio Play (PPF). Charlene also works with Broadway Barks and Braille Tails. These nonprofit organizations are dedicated to the plight of homeless animals and increasing Braille literacy among the visually impaired.